Articles and interviews

Mother Language and Linguistic Diversity

Every 21 February UNESCO celebrates the International Mother Language Day, with a special attention to indigenous and minoritized languages, to promote awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism”.
Linguapax shares this goal and participates in the celebration, but from a critical point of view around the concept of mother tongue. Instead we propose linguistic diversity as an alternative approach to languages. This is why we take the opportunity offered by the International Mother Language day to present our on-line course “Linguistic Diversity, What for”?
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Comments on “Linguapax Review 2020” articles

In December 2020 Linguapax Review 2020, the annual publication of our association, was published. This year it was focused on different aspects of translation, and it was titled Translating Diversity.  On the occasion of this event, three members of Linguapax’s international committee discussed some of the published articles. They are the following ones: Anvita Abbi on Esther Monzó-Nebot’s article “Translation, power, ethics. Challenging injustice in cross-cultural understanding and cooperation”. José…

Health and environmental crisis and minoritised languages across the Himalayas

Gerald Roche, professor at La Trobe University (Melbourne) and Linguapax International collaborator, looks over the serie of blog posts published at the Australian Himalayan Research Network focused on the management of multilingualism and the recent health and environmental crisis across the Himalayas. ____________________________________________________________________ Inspired by the surge in translation efforts in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Australian Himalayan Research Network is hosting a series of blog posts examining the…

Marja-Liisa Olthuis interviewed by Tove Skutnabb-Kangas

Marja-Liisa Olthuis interviewed by Tove Skutnabb-Kangas This short narrative is based on an email exchange where Marja-Liisa Olthuis, the Linguapax 2020 award winner replied to questions that I (TSK) sent to her in October 2020. I have summarised some of her answers; in others I have my questions and Marja-Liisa’s answers. ______________________________ Marja-Liisa Olthuis (MLO) was born in Ivalo in 1967. Her childhood home was bilingual. Her parents and grandparents spoke…

Ngugi Speaks for Us All

Mary Ann Newman Ngugi Speaks for Us All To commemorate the presentation of the Catalonia International Prize to the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o, the linguist, translator and president of the award Mary Ann Newman offers us a biographical sketch. “Ngugi talks about us. He talks about the power of languages, regardless of the number of speakers they have.” You can read the full article here.      

Impact of Language Planning and Policy on Social Integration in Highly Diverse Societies: Lessons from Catalonia and India

Swagata Basu Impact of Language Planning and Policy on Social Integration in Highly Diverse Societies: Lessons from Catalonia and India « A diverse society needs to figure out how to balance two parallel needs: the need for a common language to communicate with others, and the need of an individual to use his/her own language (even if the other does not understand). » You can read the full article here.

How can we communicate in a multilingual society? The role of translation policies and mediated intercultural communication. The case of Chile

Macarena Dehnhardt How can we communicate in a multilingual society? The role of translation policies and mediated intercultural communication. The case of Chile “In order to communicate in a multilingual society, translation and interpreting cannot be overlooked. This necessarily implies the creation of translation policies that govern these types of activities and the implementation of interpreters in public services. At the same time, it is important to complete this type…

Linguistic bordering as migration control. The unrecognized citizenship of immigrant speakers of national minority languages

Nina Carlsson Linguistic bordering as migration control. The unrecognized citizenship of immigrant speakers of national minority languages “In the few cases where knowledge of a minority language serves as a linguistic requirement for naturalization, as, for example, in Finland, where immigrants can demonstrate knowledge of Finnish or Swedish to obtain citizenship, the motivation to learn the minority language can increase considerably.” You can read the full article here.

Overcoming assimilation: plurilingual practices, linguistic capital and social rights of students with a migrant background in Catalonia

Charo Reyes Overcoming assimilation: plurilingual practices, linguistic capital and social rights of students with a migrant background in Catalonia «In an international scenario like the current one, in which the growth of “anti-immigration” parties is moving political debates away from social justice for everybody and focusing on old and renewed notions of alterity, communicative practices are often interpreted as threats to national identities, and linguistic diversity is seen as an…

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